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Saturday, July 25, 2020 | History

2 edition of Management of pure lodgepole pine stands in Central Oregon found in the catalog.

Management of pure lodgepole pine stands in Central Oregon

Erwin Kulosa

Management of pure lodgepole pine stands in Central Oregon

by Erwin Kulosa

  • 153 Want to read
  • 17 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Lodgepole pine.,
  • Forest management -- Oregon.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Erwin Kulosa.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination18 leaves, bound ;
    Number of Pages18
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14274440M

    Enhanced Management of Lodgepole Pine Applicant The Applicant is the Foothills Growth and Yield Association (FGYA). The Association consists of 11 member organizations. Names, contact persons (Steering Committee members), technical representatives (Technical Committee members), and telephone numbers are provided in Table 1. Table 1. Large, pure stands are common, and their density sometimes restricts normal growth. Some stands have over , trees per hectare, and are sometimes called ‘dog-hair’ stands. Lodgepole pine sometimes hybridizes with jack pine. Lodgepole pine trees provide excellent habitat for birds, small mammals, insects, and other animals.

    Pinus contorta, with the common names lodgepole pine and shore pine, and also known as twisted pine, and contorta pine, is a common tree in western North America. It is common near the ocean shore and in dry montane forests to the subalpine, but is rare in lowland rain forests. Like all pines (member species of the genus Pinus), it is an evergreen : Pinaceae. • Lodgepole pine’s lifecycle usually starts and ends with a crown fire. • Lodgepole pine is not Ponderosa pine. Stands aren’t unnaturally dense and frequent fires not part of their ecology. • MPB are a natural part of the ecosystem, help lower risk of crown fire and help reset the system. • Effects of MPB don’t last forever.

    Virtually pure lodgepole pine stands form an edaphic climax community over large areas of the infertile pumice plateau of south-central by: Whitebark Pine is a slow-growing, long-lived tree with a life span of up to years and sometimes more than 1, years. Although Whitebark Pine can occur in pure or nearly pure stands at high elevations, it more typically occurs in stands of mixed species in a variety of forest community types.


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Management of pure lodgepole pine stands in Central Oregon by Erwin Kulosa Download PDF EPUB FB2

Woi\booK Woodland Stand Management 63 Thinning to Prevent Mountain Pine Beetles in Lodgepole and Ponderoso Pine Devastating outbreaks of moun- tain pine beetle occur periodically throughout thelodgepole and ponderosa pine forests of western North America.

Individual outbreaks last up to two decades, killing as much as 60 percent of the trees and. areas in pine and mixed-conifer communities in central Oregon after timber har- vesting is completed.

Lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl. ex Loud.) is also planted in units where freezing temperatures are a problem because of its greater frost resis- tance (Cochran and Berntsen ).

Management of lodgepole pine in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains / Related Titles. Series: Research paper RM, By.

Alexander, Robert R. Edminster, Carleton B. Rocky Mountain Forest and Range Experiment Station (Fort Collins, Colo.) Type. no - Management of lodgepole pine in even-aged stands in the central Rocky Mountains / - Biodiversity Heritage Library The Biodiversity Heritage Library works collaboratively to make biodiversity literature openly available to the world as part of a global biodiversity community.

BHL works best with JavaScript enabledCited by: 6. Lodgepole pine - the species and its management: symposium proceedings, MaySpokane, Washington, USA and repeated MayVancouver, British Columbia, Canada David M.

Baumgartner Office of Conferences and Institutes, Cooperative Extension, Washington State University, - Lodgepole pine - pages. Lodgepole Pine Management Guidelines for Land Managers in the Wildland-Urban Interface As a consequence of the current mountain pine beetle epidemic, many landowners and land managers are concerned about how to actively manage lodgepole pine stands to: 1) treat the dead standing trees killed by the insects,File Size: 1MB.

Sierra lodgepole pine grows in the Cascade Mountains of Oregon, south through the Sierra Nevada Mountains to northern Baja California. Pinus contorta is among the most ecologically diverse of all the pines.

About lodgepole pines, Pinus contorta var. murrayana (Grev. and Balf.), growing in topoedaphic climax stands of south-central Oregon, were identified as having survived fires that occurred over a period from to All fires were natural wildfires, except for prescribed burns ofand The trees were sampled for bole and root damage to investigate fungal colonization Cited by: Ponderosa pine occurs in pure stands or may be mixed with lodgepole pine, grand fir, Douglas-fir, western larch, western white pine, incense-cedar, white fir and quaking aspen.

Ponderosa pine forests are widely distributed in eastern Oregon, ranging in elevation from 2, to 6, feet. lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), also locally called black pine, jack pine, and shore pine, a small yet ex- tremely hardy and aggressive tree that grows on both the coastal strip and nearly up to timber line on the mountains and covers vast areas of plateau in the central part of the State with pure stands of small.

Stands dominated by lodgepole pine are more similar to those of central Oregon (e.g., Stuart et al. ParkerAgee than to stands in the Sierra Nevada (e.g., ParkerPotter Culture of immature lodgepole pine stands for timber objectives.

In: Proceedings, Symposium on Management of Lodgepole Pine Ecosystems, OctoberWashington State University, USA: Pullman, Thinned and unthinned stands of lodgepole pine in eastern Oregon were evaluated in to determine their vigor and susceptibility to attack by outbreak populations of the mountain pine beetle.

Application of a vigor rating system, based on amount of stem growth per square meter of crown leaf area, showed that thinnings from below improved vigor of residual stand and reduced beetle attack. A poorly defined lodgepole pine zone occurs above the red fir (Abies magnifica) zone and below the subalpine forests of mountain hemlock (Tsuga mertensiana), whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis), and western white pine (P.

monticola). Sierra lodgepole pine forms extensive, pure stands in the Sierran lodgepole pine zone [2,12,48]. except jack pine (Pinus banksiana), lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta), and balsam fir (Abies balsamea). Jack pine is a relatively small, short-lived, early successional tree occurring in the eastern and central parts of taiga east of the Rocky Mountains.

Lodgepole pine is a longer-lived, early successional species growing in western Canada. Interactions between fire, fungi, bark beetles and lodgepole pines growing on the pumice plateau of central Oregon are described.

Mountain pine beetle (Dendroctonus ponderosae) outbreaks occur mainly in forests that are 80– years old with a mean diameter of about 25 cm and weakened by a fungus, Phaeolus schweinitzii.

The outbreak subsides after most of the large diameter trees are by:   Stand dynamics 11 years after retention harvest in a lodgepole pine forest. Forest Ecology and Management Hood, S. M., H. Smith, D. Wright, and L. Glasgow. Management Guide To Ecosystem Restoration Treatments: Multi-aged Lodgepole pine forests of Central Montana, USA RMRS-GTR Page Pine and Lodgepole Pine Stands of the South-central Oregon Pumice Zone.

Abstract approved: _____ John D. Bailey Ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa) and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta var. murrayana) forests of south-central Oregon have been extensively researched over the last century.

However, little information has been reported on overstory. The mountain pine beetle, Dendroctonus ponderosae, is a significant pest of lodgepole pine in British Columbia (BC), where it has recently reached an unprecedented outbreak level.

Although it is native to western North America, the beetle can now be viewed as a native invasive because for the first time in recorded history it has begun to reproduce in native jack pine stands within the North.

Lodgepole Pine at Crater Lake: History and Management of the Forest Structure* by Donald B. Zobel and Robert S. Zeigler** Department of Botany and Plant Pathology Oregon State University Corvallis, Oregon I. Introduction: Since the advent of white man, biotic conditions in Crater Lake NationalFile Size: 7MB.

Lodgepole. A lush green pine with a thick trunk, and foliage nearly to the ground, may be a Lodgepole. Lodgepole pine are common in Colorado, from to feet ( m to m) above sea level.

Sometimes Lodgepoles are found as low as feet ( m) or as high as treeline. Lodgepole isFile Size: KB. Ponderosa pine dominates, but lodgepole pine, aspen, Douglas-fir, western larch, incense cedar, western white pine, and some other species can be found mixed in.

The understory of these forests is often dominated by grasses, and riparian areas .Lodgepole pine (var. latifolia grows in the Cascades of Washington and northeastern mountains of Oregon and Washington.

It also grows throughout much of the Rocky Mountains. In the mountains, Lodgepole Pine grows in dry areas in the middle elevations, where it often forms pure stands of dense trees, growing into straight, slender poles.